IMG_8077

The spring flush of growth on an Acer macrophyllum growing out of the tumbled basalt of the Columbia River Gorge in Memaloose State Park. Sapindaceae, Sapindales within the Rosids. Yes, the Aceraceae is gone and Maples are ‘Roses’…not really, but they are cousins. “The maples have long been known to be closely related to the family Sapindaceae. Several taxonomists (including the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group) now include both the Aceraceae and the Hippocastanaceae in the Sapindaceae. Recent research (Harrington et al. 2005[2]) has shown that while both Aceraceae and Hippocastanaceae are monophyletic in themselves, their removal from Sapindaceae sensu lato would leave Sapindaceae sensu stricto as a paraphyletic group, particularly with reference to the genus Xanthoceras. Sapindaceae, Sapindales, Rosids

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The spring flush of growth on an Acer macrophyllum growing out of the tumbled basalt of the Columbia River Gorge in Memaloose State Park. Sapindaceae, Sapindales within the Rosids. Yes, the Aceraceae is gone and Maples are ‘Roses’…not really, but they are cousins. “The maples have long been known to be closely related to the family Sapindaceae. Several taxonomists (including the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group) now include both the Aceraceae and the Hippocastanaceae in the Sapindaceae. Recent research (Harrington et al. 2005[2]) has shown that while both Aceraceae and Hippocastanaceae are monophyletic in themselves, their removal from Sapindaceae sensu lato would leave Sapindaceae sensu stricto as a paraphyletic group, particularly with reference to the genus Xanthoceras.

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