Monthly Archives: October 2016

Failing Landscapes, Failing Practices: A Look at Tri-Met’s Landscapes and How We Could Do Them Better!

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I include this photo, taken beneath the west approaches to the Marquam Bridge, an ODoT property not Tri-Met, as a reference for what is commonly found in transportation rights-of-way. This is not a problem solely with Tri-Met’s landscapes. It crosses the southern end of South Waterfront Park which was one of my responsibilities for 15 years and so I’m familiar with its level of care or lack thereof. The nearest portion, to just beyond the nearest piers, was entirely neglected for the entire period except for where I cut it down to reduce the amount of weed seed I had to deal with in the Park. There is literally nothing that was intentionally planted in the entire space. It is a landscape composed entirely of weeds and it is possible because landscapes for ODoT are of an extremely low priority. It is the neighboring properties that bear the brunt of their decision. It will be interesting to see if they come under increasing pressure over the years as the expensive and undeveloped properties to their south are developed. Currently the Knight Cancer Institute is developing a hundred yards or more away. The Marriot Residence Inn, immediately to its north, has had no effect on its level of care.

About a year ago I posted a series of three articles on Tri-Met’s landscapes along the new Orange Line.  They were a critical assessment of their design with many photos and explanations for my criticisms.  I had a brief correspondence with the project manager after the first two before he stopped responding.  I had asked about the maintenance schedule that they had with the contractor who would be doing the work.  I did not receive it.  Part of the reason was mine, as new ideas came up for me, my interest wavered and I moved on.  Still, I’ve never received anything.  Now, a year later, I decided to reassess the first portion of the landscape that  I wrote about, as it is a section I regularly walk and ride by bike to downtown or to just get out.  I would encourage readers to see my previously posted reviews. Continue reading

Here, Sharkey's 20'4" lays across the sidewalk against our railing.

Agave: ‘Sharkey’, Death and the Meaning of Life

It’s noon and Sharkey is dismembered.  Here’s how it happened:

‘Agave down! I repeat, Wind is up and Sharkey is down!’ (This was the Facebook post I made on Oct. 13 coming home after dark.)

Nothing terribly dramatic, Sharkey just succumbed to the wind, toppling to the east, guided by the fishing line into the adjacent Callistemon and Palm. More wind this afternoon and, of course, on its way tomorrow!  (This followed the next morning.)

Do you remember last nights storm? I was out for about an hour during commute with a neighbor trying to keep drains clear and the river of water out of our basement! Sharkey is now laying on our railing. Julie says that I’m like a pet owner denying the inevitable who thinks he’s getting better. I’m afraid he’s just a head knocker for pedestrians now! (I posted this this morning.) Continue reading

Helping Homeowners Choose Trees Wisely: what you need to know

Trees originate in a particular environments, not an urban one. This landscape of California Interior Live Oaks creates a beautiful natural alle'e through the woods. These native Oaks can soften a street scene over time, are well adapted to our street environment requiring little effort on our part beyond structural pruning.

Trees originate in a particular environment, not an urban one. This landscape of California Oaks creates a beautiful natural alle’e through the woods. These native Oaks can soften a street scene over time, are well adapted to our street environment requiring little effort on our part beyond structural pruning.

The urban environment can be an extremely stressful one to live in.  This is no less true for plants than it is for us, the people, who created and maintains this place for our own use.  It is no less naive to believe that a tree, planted out by someone, no matter how much they may love at least the idea of trees, in a random parking strip or next to their place of business, will thrive after a year or two of well intentioned irrigation, on its own than it is to think that a child will grow up to be strong, happy and successful simply by having its first few years of nutrition provided for….Cities are economic and social constructs.  They did not rise ‘organically’ from the soil supporting a diverse and complex community of species.  Life has had to ‘fit’ in where ever it can.  Much has been unable to.  Many of us plant trees because we feel the loss, the absence of life, and realize that these places are less for it, that we ‘suffer’ because of this.  But we cannot simply add trees and stir.  These are ‘broken’ places and we have to pay more attention to our choices and provide better care than this place alone can provide…otherwise it would be like turning out our children, still unformed, on their own.  Even if we were Spartans and believed that only the ‘strong’ deserved to live, we would be dooming them in these modern, contrived and, in many ways, diminished cities.  As responsible parents and tree stewards, we are bound to them.  We owe them our best.  Without it they will fail and the world that we have built around us will be less as well. Continue reading